ajaxizing

Following from my previous post, I’ve come across another issue related to caching in wordpress: dynamic content. There’s a constant trade-off between caching and dynamic content. If you want your content to be truly dynamic, you can’t cache it properly. If you cache the whole page, it won’t show the latest update. W3 Total Cache, WP Super Cache and others have some workarounds for this. For example, W3TC has something called fragment caching. So if you have a widget that displays dynamic content, you can use fragment caching to prevent caching. However, from what I worked out, all it does is essentially prevent the page with the fragment from being fully cached, which defeats the purpose of caching (especially if this widget is on the sidebar of all pages).

The best solution for these cases is using ajax, to asynchronously pull dynamic content from the server using Javascript. So whilst many plugins already support ajax, and can load data dynamically for you, many others don’t. So what can you do if you have a plugin that you use, and you want to ‘ajaxize’ it?? Well, there are a few solutions out there. For example this post shows you how to do it, and works quite well.

The thing is, I wanted to take it a step further. If I can do it by following this manual process, why can’t I use a plugin that, erm, ‘ajaxizes’ other plugins?? I tried to search for solutions, but found none. So I decided to write one myself. It’s my first ‘proper’ plugin, but I think it works pretty well. Continue reading “ajaxizing”

thumbs up

[IMPORTANT: please check that you have the latest version of timthumb! older versions might have a serious security vulnerability. A little more about it here]

I’ve been recently trying to optimize a wordpress based site. It was running fine, but I wanted to run it even faster, and make the best use of resources. So I ended up picking W3 Total Cache (W3TC). It’s very robust and highly configurable, if perhaps a bit complicated to fully figure out. So eventually things were running fine, and my next task was to boost it even further by using a Content Delivery Network (CDN). In this case, the choice was Amazon Cloudfront. The recent release allowed managing custom origin from the console, which made things even easier. One of the remaining issues however, was trying to optimize timthumb.

Timthumb was already included with the theme, and I liked the way it works. It allowed some neat features, like fitting screenshots nicely, and also fitting company logos well within a fixed size (with zc=2 option). Google search has led me to a couple of sources. However, for some reason none of them worked, so I ended using a slightly different solution… Continue reading “thumbs up”