Why is Backblaze tracking me?

This is a follow-up to my previous post: hey.com is onto something with its tracking-pixel blocker. I mentioned contacting Backblaze about their email tracking there.

I didn’t think too much of it at the time, and honestly (or naively?) was expecting some kind of a “Oh, yes, you’re right, there’s no need to track those emails”… But it didn’t unfold in quite the same way.

TL;DR

This is my own interpretation, obviously. Backblaze seems to think that tracking emails is totally fine, even under the GDPR. They’re not going to stop doing it until further notice.

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hosting-compose (or) the sad buyout of Webfaction

docker-compose is one of those essential tools that make working with docker so much better. I do use docker directly occasionally, but anything non-trivial, I’d reach out docker-compose immediately. It allows you to “glue” things together and describe the stack in such a neat way.

I currently handle my dev environments with docker-compose, and even some live and staging deployments (like thumbor). I also manage remote database backups with it (using restic, postgresql, stunnel, redis and rdb-tools). In the latter example, it saves me from installing different versions of the database clients and connectors. I am able to instantly upgrade them, and then connect to the remote databases and back them up or restore. It makes the backup system itself immutable and disposable.

Recently however, I started using docker-compose for something that I haven’t considered before: a replacement for shared hosting.

a snippet of my hosting-compose docker-compose.yml

Why?

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