Why is Backblaze tracking me?

This is a follow-up to my previous post: hey.com is onto something with its tracking-pixel blocker. I mentioned contacting Backblaze about their email tracking there.

I didn’t think too much of it at the time, and honestly (or naively?) was expecting some kind of a “Oh, yes, you’re right, there’s no need to track those emails”… But it didn’t unfold in quite the same way.

TL;DR

This is my own interpretation, obviously. Backblaze seems to think that tracking emails is totally fine, even under the GDPR. They’re not going to stop doing it until further notice.

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Who’s sharing my data? … and who the hell is Dave M. Rogenmoser?

I’m no longer active on Facebook, but at the moment, oddly, it’s my main goto option to find out at least some of the companies that share my data.

Facebook lets you see who shared your data with them. There are two interesting pages, buried and well-hidden, worth checking: Off Facebook activity and Businesses who uploaded and used a list.

Want to see which companies are sharing your data? continue reading.

Continue reading “Who’s sharing my data? … and who the hell is Dave M. Rogenmoser?”

hey.com is onto something with its tracking-pixel blocker

When I first saw the tracking pixel blocking feature of hey.com I didn’t think too much of it. In fact, I thought it was making it into something more than it really was.

I typically block all images on my emails, and that’s good enough. I also have an ad-blocker (both via DNS and in the browser), so I can eliminate the issue right there without too much fanfare.

But I was wrong. It’s not just about blocking them.

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Bunq freeloading: joint accounts now cost at least 59.9% more, your privacy doesn’t matter either

My wife and I joined Bunq a couple of months ago. Bunq is a fairly new European bank, based in the Netherlands. It’s one of the new breed of mobile-first banks that offer a more modern experience. It has a neat mobile app with some clever features like dynamic sub-accounts, spend tracking, better credit card control and more.

Their slogan is “bank of the free”. Whilst other banks might not charge you to open an account or use it, Bunq actually does charge for its account. However, the “free” part, as far as I understood it, is that by paying bunq, they can provide a service to you, rather than find ways to monetize you (e.g. by advertising, selling your data).

As you can see from the marketing spiel, they value transparency and don’t do any dirty business.

Until they do…

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Does Apple care about your privacy?

I’ve been an Apple user since 2005 or so. Well, unless you consider my Apple IIc, in which case I guess I was a customer since 1987. I managed to negotiate with my parents to bundle two birthdays (my 12th and my Bar Mitzvah, that’s a big one) to get one of those. It was a turning point in my life… But I digress.

By Bilby – Own work, CC BY 3.0, Link

I really admire Apple’s push for security without compromising convenience, with Touch ID and Face ID making things safer. Apple’s touting their efforts to reduce web tracking, and Tim Cook publicly stated that “We at Apple believe that privacy is a fundamental human right”.

But when it comes to their own backyard, does Apple even meet the requirements of the GDPR? (The European privacy directive). I don’t think so.

Continue reading “Does Apple care about your privacy?”